Details » Clan Genesis

- Url: http://genesis.informe.com/
- Category: Gaming: Clans
- Description: Perfect World Clan
- Members: 123
- Created On: Feb 25, 2008
- Posts: 556
- Hits: 7497
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User Comments:
1. | Dec 10, 2013
Great question, Deb! There are a few tirgminms I would avoid in stock, and they're all for different reasons (you're correct that bitterness is one). Here goes! Avoid anything in the cabbage family (broccoli, cauliflower, brussel sprouts) these fellows tend to get bitter when boiled. Cabbage tirgminms are better used raw or roasted (roasting gives them a very pleasant sweet-roasty flavor). Root vegetables: I avoid beets because of their overwhelming color and radishes because of their overwhelming flavor, anything else that is a root is pretty much fair game. Strongly flavored herbs can be overwhelming (think rosemary, oregano, sage and their relatives). Trimmings from these herbs can be used to add a distinct herbal flavor(if that's what you want), but wait until your boiling is done and add the herb scraps to infuse for a few minutes. Also avoid peels from any above-ground veggies like squash, cucumbers and eggplant. The skin of these vegetables (well, fruit but that's a whole different discussion) can be bitter, but more importantly they don't have much positive flavor to contribute. If you scrape the seeds and pulp out of your squash or cucumbers, though, those tasty scraps can definitely be added to your broth mix.
2. | Dec 10, 2013
Hey, Adam, don't you think the freshwater anlergs of SJ would be better served by the State eliminating the trout stocking and focusing instead on enhancing the habitat and numbers of those species more natural to the region, like bass, crappie, and pickeral? Trout (and trout stamps) don't fit in slow-moving, warmer blackwater, except that the State can make a few extra bucks by convincing spring and fall Saturday anlergs that they're really fishing with fly-rods and nymphs in the fast moving streamwaters of upstate New York.